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Egypt
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Number of conflicts and events in country (2010-2020)
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Armed conflicts (2019-2022)

Most conflicts initially start out as very local phenomena. Monitoring political violence events at local-level can help anticipate the escalation of conflicts within states, recognise signs of crisis development and determine likely conflict trajectories. The Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project (ACLED) collects reported information on internal political conflict disaggregated by date, location and actors to facilitate local and scale-dependant research on war patterns and processes. This layer shows all political violence and protest events recorded by ACLED in Africa for the period 2019-2022.


Number of conflicts and events in country (2010-2020)


Other SDGs


Security Peace Conflicts, Violence, Criminal networks Maritime Security Sustainable Growth & Jobs Gender & Inequality Politics War & Peace People Life Expectancy


Source: Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project (ACLED)

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Biodiversity Hotspots (% of country area)
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Biodiversity Hotspots

Biodiversity hotspots are the Earth’s most biologically rich—yet heavily threatened—terrestrial regions. These are regions where success in conserving species can have an enormous impact in securing our global biodiversity. To qualify as a biodiversity hotspot, an area must meet two strict criteria: it must contain at least 1,500 species of vascular plants found nowhere else on Earth (known as "endemic" species), and it must have lost at least 70% of its primary native vegetation. 36 regions are identified as hotspots by Conservation International and partners, 9 of which lay (partially or fully) in Africa. This dataset shows their location.


Biodiversity Hotspots (% of country area)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Protected Areas & Ecological Networks


Source: Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF)

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Number of Chinese Government-financed projects (2000-2014)
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Chinese Government-funded projects

How do development projects influence the geographic distribution of economic activity within low-income and middle-income countries? Existing research focuses on the effects of Western development projects on inter-personal inequality and inequality across different subnational regions. However, China has become a major financier of economic infrastructure in Africa. This dataset geo-locates Chinese Government-financed projects between 2000 and 2014. It captures 3,485 projects worth $273.6 billion in total official financing. It includes both Chinese aid and non-concessional official financing. Chinese development projects in general, and Chinese transportation projects in particular, appear to reduce economic inequality within and between subnational localities.


Number of Chinese Government-financed projects (2000-2014)


Other SDGs


Economy Sustainable Growth & Jobs Gender & Inequality Politics Rural Development Territorial Development Urban Development


Source: AidData

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Crop land (% of country area)
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Cropland extent

By detecting areas where agricultural production deficits might occur, it is possible to prevent food security crises and anticipate response planning. To do this, we need accurate and reliable information on agricultural land cover. This layer shows the extent of cropland in Africa. Each pixel represents the fraction of the area covered by cropland (i.e. the percentage of the pixel with crops).


Crop land (% of country area)


Other SDGs

GOAL 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, GOAL 2: Zero Hunger


Natural Resources Food and Agriculture Land Use in Agriculture


Source: EC-JRC

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Total carbon (Pg)
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Dead Wood Carbon

The Dead Wood Carbon and Litter Carbon pools have been estimated at global level as constant fractions of ESA Biomass CCI Above Ground Biomass (AGB), v.3 (2018) using a lookup table based on global ecological zone, elevation and precipitation regime, as proposed by Harris, N.L., Gibbs, D.A., Baccini, A. et al. Global maps of twenty-first century forest carbon fluxes. Nat. Clim. Chang. 11, 234–240 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00976-6


Total carbon (Pg)


Other SDGs

GOAL 13: Climate Action


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Forests Ecosystem Services


Source: EC-JRC

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Forest Cover (% of country area)
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Forest Cover

Forests worldwide are in a state of flux, with accelerating losses in some regions and gains in others. Given the recognized importance of forest ecosystem services, quantification of global forest extent and change is needed. This map displays the tree cover in the year 2000. Tree cover is defined as canopy closure for all vegetation taller than 5m in height and is expressed as a percentage per output grid cell, in the range 0–100.


Forest Cover (% of country area)


Other SDGs


Climate Change Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Forests


Source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA

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Forest Gain (% of country area)
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Forest Gain

Forests worldwide are in a state of flux, with accelerating losses in some regions and gains in others. Given the recognized importance of forest ecosystem services, quantification of global forest extent and change is needed. This map displays the forest gain during the period 2000–2018. Forest gain is defined as the inverse of loss, or a change from non-forest to forest entirely within the study period. It is expressed as either 1 (gain) or 0 (no gain).


Forest Gain (% of country area)


Other SDGs


Climate Change Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Forests


Source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA

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Forest Loss (% of country area)
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Forest Loss

Forests worldwide are in a state of flux, with accelerating losses in some regions and gains in others. Given the recognized importance of forest ecosystem services, quantification of global forest extent and change is needed. This map displays the forest loss during the period 2000–2018, defined as a stand-replacement disturbance, or a change from forest to non-forest state. It is expressed as either 1 (loss - in red) or 0 (no loss).


Forest Loss (% of country area)


Other SDGs


Climate Change Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Forests


Source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA

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Frequency of hotspots of agricultural production anomaly
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Frequency of hotspots of agricultural production anomaly

Food crisis response planning can save lives if put in place in a timely manner. To do this, decision makers must be warned of climate extreme events impacting agricultural production. The Anomaly hotSpot of Agricultural Production tool (ASAP) is an online decision support system for early warning about hotspots of agricultural production anomaly (crop and rangeland), developed by the JRC for food security crises prevention and response planning anticipation. This map shows the frequency at which countries were classified as hotspots for agricultural production problems between 2004 and 2018. Hotspots are identified on a monthly basis.


Frequency of hotspots of agricultural production anomaly


Other SDGs

GOAL 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, GOAL 2: Zero Hunger


Land Use in Agriculture Yields Food per Person Crop Health


Source: EC-JRC

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Frequency of ten-daily warnings about crop anomalies (country weighted percentage)
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Frequency of ten-daily warnings about crop anomalies

Food crisis response planning can save lives if put in place in a timely manner. To do this, decision makers must be warned of climate extreme events impacting agricultural production. The Anomaly hotSpot of Agricultural Production tool (ASAP) is an online decision support system for early warning about hotspots of agricultural production anomaly (crop and rangeland), developed by the JRC for food security crises prevention and response planning anticipation. This map shows the frequency of ASAP anomaly warnings for crop growth for 2004-2018. It highlights the high sensitivity of the main agricultural areas in Northern Africa, the Horn of Africa and the Southern African Development Community to drought conditions.


Frequency of ten-daily warnings about crop anomalies (country weighted percentage)


Other SDGs

GOAL 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, GOAL 2: Zero Hunger


Food and Agriculture Land Use in Agriculture Yields Crop Health


Source: EC-JRC

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Frequency of ten-daily warnings about rangeland anomalies (country weighted percentage)
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Frequency of ten-daily warnings about rangeland anomalies

Food crisis response planning can save lives if put in place in a timely manner. To do this, decision makers must be warned of climate extreme events impacting agricultural production. The Anomaly hotSpot of Agricultural Production tool (ASAP) is an online decision support system for early warning about hotspots of agricultural production anomaly (crop and rangeland), developed by the JRC for food security crises prevention and response planning anticipation. This map shows the frequency of ASAP anomaly warnings for rangeland growth for 2004-2018. It highlights the high sensitivity of the main agricultural areas in Northern Africa, the Horn of Africa and the Southern African Development Community to drought conditions.


Frequency of ten-daily warnings about rangeland anomalies (country weighted percentage)


Other SDGs

GOAL 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, GOAL 2: Zero Hunger


Natural Disasters Natural Resources Food and Agriculture Crop Health


Source: EC-JRC

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Key Landscapes for Conservation (% of country terrestrial and marine area)
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Key Landscapes for Conservation

Some areas in Africa represent spectacular, still viable examples of Africa’s wildlife and wild places. They are of such outstanding importance and value that they should be conserved at all costs and in principle forever. Those areas are referred to as Key Landscapes for Conservation or KLCs. A suitable network of KLCs has the potential to protect the well-known wildlife species within natural ecosystems and to stimulate rural economic growth.


Key Landscapes for Conservation (% of country terrestrial and marine area)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Protected Areas & Ecological Networks


Source: EC-JRC

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Degraded Lands (% of country area)
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Land Degradation

Humans need increasingly more biomass for food, fodder, fiber and energy. In Africa, circa 22% of the vegetated land surface showed a decline or unstable land productivity between 1999 and 2013. Persistent reduction of land productivity points to long-term alteration of the health and productive capacity of the land, which are characteristic of land degradation. It has impact on ecosystem services and benefits, thus on the sustainable livelihoods of human communities. This map shows the dynamics of (vegetated) land productivity over a time period, in other terms the trajectories of above-ground biomass. It reflects changes in ecosystem functioning e.g. vegetation growth cycles due to natural variation and/or human intervention, and can be associated with processes of land degradation or recovery. The 5 classes depict two levels of persistent productivity decline, one level of instability or stress in capacity, one level of stable productivity and one level of increased productivity.


Degraded Lands (% of country area)


Other SDGs

GOAL 5: Gender Equality, GOAL 7: Affordable and Clean Energy


Climate Change Land Degradation Desertification Deforestation Natural Resources Food and Agriculture Land Use in Agriculture Crop Health


Source: EC-JRC

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Total carbon (Pg)
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Litter Carbon

The Dead Wood Carbon and Litter Carbon pools have been estimated at global level as constant fractions of ESA Biomass CCI Above Ground Biomass (AGB), v.3 (2018) using a lookup table based on global ecological zone, elevation and precipitation regime, as proposed by Harris, N.L., Gibbs, D.A., Baccini, A. et al. Global maps of twenty-first century forest carbon fluxes. Nat. Clim. Chang. 11, 234–240 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00976-6


Total carbon (Pg)


Other SDGs

GOAL 13: Climate Action


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Forests Ecosystem Services


Source: EC-JRC

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Natural Areas (% of country area)
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Natural Areas

Whether you’re monitoring crops, modelling green energy installations or soil sealing, combatting loss of natural resources or just helping countries meet their Sustainable Development Goals, chances are high that you’ll need an accurate and spatially detailed map on land cover and land use. Earth Observation satellites, like those from EU’s flagship programme Copernicus, are key to providing such maps, at a global scale, with free and open access. Derived from the Copernicus Global Land Cover, this map represents the distribution of areas where land cover is not heavily disturbed by man’s activities. In other words, it shows areas where natural ecosystems and their associated species are expected to be found.


Natural Areas (% of country area)


Other SDGs

GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities, GOAL 13: Climate Action, GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-being


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Forests


Source: EC-JRC

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Oilpalm plantations (% of country area)
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Oil Palm Plantations

Oil seed crops, especially oil palm, are among the most rapidly expanding agricultural land uses, and their expansion is known to cause significant environmental damage. Accordingly, these crops often feature in public and policy debates, which are hampered or biased by a lack of accurate information on environmental impacts. This dataset presents a global crop map. It covers areas where oil palm plantations were detected at global scale, and includes industrial and smallholder mature oil palm plantations.


Oilpalm plantations (% of country area)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Forests Food and Agriculture Food Production


Source: EC-JRC

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Protected lands (% of country area)
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Protected Areas

Protected areas have long played a crucial role in protecting natural landscapes and wildlife, and many consider them to be one of the most effective tools in protecting biodiversity. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) officially defines a protected area as ' a clearly defined geographical space, recognised, dedicated and managed, through legal or other effective means, to achieve the long term conservation of nature with associated ecosystem services and cultural values'. Protected areas also play a key role in preserving the benefits that nature brings to people, often referred to as 'ecosystem services'. They come in many shapes and sizes, ranging from strict nature reserves where only scientific research is permitted, to areas that allow natural resources to be used. The World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) is the most comprehensive global database of marine and terrestrial protected areas.


Protected lands (% of country area)


Other SDGs

GOAL 14: Life Below Water


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Protected Areas & Ecological Networks


Source: UNEP-WCMC/IUCN

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Rangeland (% of country area)
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Rangeland

By detecting areas where agricultural production deficits might occur, it is possible to prevent food security crises and anticipate response planning. To do this, we need accurate and reliable information on agricultural land cover. This layer shows the extent of rangeland in Africa. Each pixel represents the fraction of the area covered by rangeland (i.e. the percentage of the pixel with rangeland).


Rangeland (% of country area)


Other SDGs

GOAL 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, GOAL 2: Zero Hunger


Food and Agriculture Land Use in Agriculture Yields Food per Person Crop Health


Source: EC-JRC

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Raw Materials Trade - Export (USD)
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Raw Materials Trade - Export (USD)

Raw materials are essential for the sustainable functioning of modern societies and their industries. The European Commission's Raw Materials Information System (RMIS) is developed by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in cooperation with the DG for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (GROWTH). The RMIS is the Commission’s reference web-based knowledge platform on non-fuel, non-agricultural raw materials from primary and secondary sources. From gold to natural rubber, including cobalt, cooking coal, construction aggregates (sand, gravel...) and many more, it focuses on both abiotic and biotic materials, covering the entire value chain. This map shows the amount (in USD) of the main non-food, non-energy raw material commodities exported by each African country in 2017.


Raw Materials Trade - Export (USD)


Other SDGs

GOAL 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth


Economy Sustainable Growth & Jobs Gender & Inequality Raw Materials


Source: EC-JRC

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Raw Materials Trade - Import (USD)
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Raw Materials Trade - Import (USD)

Raw materials are essential for the sustainable functioning of modern societies and their industries. The European Commission's Raw Materials Information System (RMIS) is developed by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in cooperation with the DG for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (GROWTH). The RMIS is the Commission’s reference web-based knowledge platform on non-fuel, non-agricultural raw materials from primary and secondary sources. From gold to natural rubber, including cobalt, cooking coal, construction aggregates (sand, gravel...) and many more, it focuses on both abiotic and biotic materials, covering the entire value chain. This map shows the amount (in USD) of the main non-food, non-energy raw material commodities imported by each African country in 2017.


Raw Materials Trade - Import (USD)


Other SDGs

GOAL 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth


Economy Sustainable Growth & Jobs Gender & Inequality Raw Materials


Source: EC-JRC

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Population Density (People per km2)
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Residential population

In an age of Development Agendas that call for universal inclusiveness of people, global population grids are essential to support analyses and inform policy-making in a wide range of fields, from environmental assessment to disaster risk analysis and reduction. This map combines the best-available population estimates (from CIESIN Gridded Population of the World) with the best-available assessment of the spatial extents of human settlements (inferred from Landsat satellite data). It depicts the distribution and density of population, expressed as the number of people per cell, at high spatial resolution (250m) for the year 2015.


Population Density (People per km2)


Other SDGs


Sustainable Growth & Jobs Urban Development People Population Growth Migration & Mobility Energy


Source: EC-JRC

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Soil Diversity (Number of Soil Types in Country)
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Soil Map

In most people's mind, soil would not figure highly in a list of the natural resources of Africa. However, healthy and fertile soils are the cornerstones of food security, key environmental services, social cohesion and the economies of most African countries. Unfortunately, soil in Africa tends to reach public awareness only when it fails – often with catastrophic consequences as seen by the famine episodes of the Sahel in the 1980s and more recently in Niger and the Horn of Africa. In the context of major global environmental challenges such as food security, climate change, fresh water scarcity and biodiversity loss, the protection and the sustainable management of soil resources in Africa are of paramount importance. This layer presents the diversity of soil types across Africa. This map was produced by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission for the Soil Atlas of Africa.


Soil Diversity (Number of Soil Types in Country)


Other SDGs

GOAL 13: Climate Action, GOAL 15: Life on Land


Natural Resources Soil Land Use in Agriculture Crop Health


Source: EC-JRC

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Terrestrial Priority Ecoregions (% of country area)
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Terrestrial Priority Ecoregions

A global strategy to conserve biodiversity must aim to protect representative examples of all of the world’s ecosystems, as well as those areas that contain exceptional concentrations of species and endemics. The WWF’s Global 200 project analysed global patterns of biodiversity to identify a set of the Earth's terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecoregions that harbour exceptional biodiversity and are representative of its ecosystems. The process yielded 238 ecoregions (the Global 200) comprised of 142 terrestrial, 53 freshwater, and 43 marine priority ecoregions. The map shows their location on the African continent. Effective conservation in these ecoregions would help conserve the most outstanding and representative habitats for biodiversity on this planet.


Terrestrial Priority Ecoregions (% of country area)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Protected Areas & Ecological Networks


Source: WWF

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Total carbon (Pg)
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Total Carbon

Carbon storage in biomass (biological material) is a key link in the global carbon cycle, and consequently for climate change mitigation. Forests in particular are an important carbon sink that help reduce the greenhouse effect. Together, the above-ground carbon (carbon fraction contained in the stems, barks, branches and twigs of living trees), the belowground biomass carbon (carbon fraction contained in roots of living trees) and the soil organic carbon (amount of carbon stored in the soil) provide a complete overview of the total carbon stored in forest areas (trees and soil). This map shows the total carbon stored expressed in units of dry mass (Mg) per ground area unit (km2).


Total carbon (Pg)


Other SDGs

GOAL 13: Climate Action


Natural Resources Biodiversity & Wildlife Forests Ecosystem Services


Source: EC-JRC

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Rate of urbanisation
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Urban Areas

Africa is projected to have the fastest urban growth rate in the world — by 2050, Africa’s cities will be home to an additional 950 million people. Urban planning and management are essential development challenges. Understanding urbanisation, its drivers, dynamics and impacts, is key to designing targeted, inclusive and foward-looking policies at the local, national and continental levels. Africapolis data and evidence supports cities and governments to make urban areas more inclusive, productive and sustainable. This map of urban population covers 7 500 agglomerations in 50 countries for the base year 2015.


Rate of urbanisation


Other SDGs


Climate Change Pollution Sustainable Growth & Jobs Urban Development People Population Growth


Source: Africapolis

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Net change of permanent surface water (2018 – 1985)
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Water Occurrence (1984-2020)

Surface water affects many aspects of our world: the exchange of heat, gas and water vapour between the planet's surface and atmosphere. Water is the engine behind the distribution, movement and migration of Earth's plant and animal life and is just as essential for humans. It affects our capacity to grow crops and manage animal grazing lands, to run our industrial processes, to manufacture goods, it influences the movement of disease-vectors, toxins and pollutants, it generates energy directly (hydroelectric) and indirectly (thermoelectric), it is an essential part of our transport network, and forms part of our recreational, cultural and sporting world. The Water Occurrence dataset shows where surface water occurred between 1984 and 2018. Open water is any stretch of water open to the sky, and includes both freshwater and saltwater. The map displays water surfaces greater than 30m2 that are visible from space, including natural (rivers, lakes, coastal margins and wetlands) and artificial water bodies (reservoirs formed by dams, flooded areas such as opencast mines and quarries, flood irrigation areas such as paddy fields, and water bodies created by hydro-engineering projects such as waterway and harbour construction). This product captures both the intra and inter-annual variability and changes. The permanent water surfaces (100% occurrence over 36 years) are represented in blue, and areas where water sometimes occurs are shown in shades of pink to purple (0% < occurrence < 100%). The paler shades are areas where the water occurs less frequently. The map can support better informed water-management decision-making.


Net change of permanent surface water (2018 – 1985)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Water & Freshwater Energy


Source: EC-JRC

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Lakes Trophic State Deviation (%)
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Water Quality – Trophic State

Freshwater, in sufficient quantity and quality, is essential for all aspects of life and fundamental to sustainable development. Yet water-related ecosystems are threatened by human activities. Eutrophication is a common threat: the excessive growth of algae resulting in oxygen depletion. It can be occasional or frequent. To monitor this process, one can use the trophic state index. It refers to the degree at which organic matter accumulates in the lake and may be used to infer its particular state, or quality. A five year baseline (2006- 2010), per lake, has been produced. The maps depicts mean deviations (low to extreme) of trophic state in recent years (2017-2019) compared to the individual lake baseline measurements.


Lakes Trophic State Deviation (%)


Other SDGs

GOAL 6: Clean Water and Sanitation


Natural Resources Water & Freshwater


Source: EC-JRC

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Lakes Turbidity State Deviation (%)
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Water Quality – Turbidity

Freshwater, in sufficient quantity and quality, is essential for all aspects of life and fundamental to sustainable development. Turbidity is an indicator of water clarity, quantifying the haziness of the water and acting as an indicator of underwater light availability. Light penetration may or may not be sufficient to support the growth of aquatic plants and adversely affect fish and shellfish populations. This parameter may be used to infer a particular state, or quality, of a freshwater body (lake, wetland or river). Mangroves, for instance, are known to reduce the turbidity of waters. A five year baseline (2006-2010), per lake, has been produced. The maps depicts mean deviations (classified from low to extreme) of turbidity in recent years (2017-2019) compared to the individual lake baseline measurements.


Lakes Turbidity State Deviation (%)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Water & Freshwater


Source: EC-JRC

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Permanent water difference (%)
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Water Transitions (1984-2018)

Freshwater, in sufficient quantity and quality, is essential for all aspects of life and fundamental to sustainable development. Yet water-related ecosystems are threatened by human activities (flow alteration; loss of connectivity; pollution; habitat degradation and loss; overexploitation of species). Tracking changes in water-related ecosystems enables decision makers to determine the extent of change over time, understand the threats and implement appropriate mitigation measures. The water transition map shows the total change in the annual extent of permanent and seasonal surface water area for lakes and rivers between 1984 and 2018. It includes surfaces of: permanent water (i.e. area where water is present 12 months per year), new permanent water (i.e. conversion of land into permanent water), lost permanent water (i.e. conversion of permanent water into land), seasonal water (i.e. area where water is present less than 12 months per year), new seasonal water (i.e. conversion of land to seasonal water), lost seasonal water (i.e. conversion of seasonal water to land), seasonal to permanent (i.e. conversion of seasonal water into permanent water) and permanent to seasonal (i.e. conversion of permanent water into seasonal water).


Permanent water difference (%)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Water & Freshwater


Source: EC-JRC

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Permanent water difference in Reservoires (%)
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Water Transitions in Reservoir (1984-2018)

Freshwater, in sufficient quantity and quality, is essential for all aspects of life and fundamental to sustainable development. Yet water-related ecosystems are threatened by human activities (flow alteration; loss of connectivity; pollution; habitat degradation and loss; overexploitation of species). Tracking changes in water-related ecosystems enables decision makers to determine the extent of change over time, understand the threats and implement appropriate mitigation measures. Reservoirs are defined as artificial, human-made water bodies. The water transition in reservoir map shows the total change in annual extent of reservoir surface water area between 1984 and 2018. It includes surfaces of: permanent water (i.e. area where water is present 12 months per year), new permanent water (i.e. conversion of land into permanent water), lost permanent water (i.e. conversion of permanent water into land), seasonal water (i.e. area where water is present less than 12 months per year), new seasonal water (i.e. conversion of land to seasonal water), lost seasonal water (i.e. conversion of seasonal water to land), seasonal to permanent (i.e. conversion of seasonal water into permanent water) and permanent to seasonal (i.e. conversion of permanent water into seasonal water).


Permanent water difference in Reservoires (%)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Water & Freshwater


Source: EC-JRC

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Wetlands coverage (% of country area)
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Wetlands

Water is essential for life on Earth and a critical natural resource that underpins all social and economic activity. Ensuring water and sanitation for all is one of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 6) of the 2030 Agenda. Target 6.6 specifically aims to protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including wetlands. This map shows the total area covered by inland vegetated wetlands. It includes swamps, marshes, peatlands, bogs and fens, the vegetated parts of floodplains as well as rice paddies and flood recession agriculture.


Wetlands coverage (% of country area)


Other SDGs


Natural Resources Water & Freshwater


Source: DHI-GRAS